The Golden Age of Horror Films

What to watch this Halloween

Miguel Moreno, Editor

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America celebrates Halloween differently. Some go out with their friends or children and get candy. Others go to amusement parks to get a scare out of the attractions. Others give out candy while doing a Horror movie marathon. If you are looking to see something different this year for Halloween, go and experience classic and pretty much the original horror movies that shaped modern horror.

What is the Golden Age of Horror? It is the period of time where movies such as Dracula (1931), Dead of Night (1945), and The Phantom of the Opera (1925). This period consists from around 1919 to 1948. It is believed that what made the Horror genre a great upcoming topic for early filmmakers was that the silent films translated better when they were told with an eerie silence, making it more suspenseful and interesting than other films in the early days of Cinema.

The company that made the most out of the golden age was Universal Pictures. With them producing films such as previously mentioned Dracula (1931), The Mummy (1932), The Black Cat (1934), and The Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Universal Pictures pretty much cultured the classic monsters of film. This matters right now because most of the modern horror films have based film tricks or techniques that can be seen in modern films as well. For example, the increase in music when there is trouble or a monster shows up. This is something so prevalent in modern film that most do not stop to consider the origin.

If you have never seen any of the films that have been mentioned, they are good for a Halloween marathon. The three most strongly recommend films are Nosferatu (1922) which is considered the second Horror film ever made and profoundly greatly received. Speaking of classics, a more known movie is Frankenstein (1931) a classic and the birth of the popularity of Frankenstein’s monster. And my personal favorite The Raven (1935). This follows the flow and style of one of Poe’s stories. Some of these movies may not be as strong as modern horror movies where they are more likely to get bloody and excessive. If you want to watch something new, watch something from the past, these movies are what shaped most of the horror we see today.

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